Are you feeling a bit of a square?

Well, it’s all going a bit square-shaped here at ArtGallery too, as we have gone slightly Cubism-mad!

Cubism is the modernist style that fits perfectlly into smart, stylish or minimalist interiors. Let's take a look at Cubist art - a style that changed the face of art and was the start of what we now call modern art.

The Cubist style has certainly stood the test of time as it still works with a range of interior styles today. 

When is a square not a square?

When photography entered mainstream society there was less of a need for paintings to be so realistic, especially when it came to portraiture. A camera could capture the likeness of a person, which left artists free to experiment with paint, reinvent what art means to society and create new styles.

Enter Picasso.

He realised that art could represent reality in different ways and that we could look at differently. It didn’t have to look ‘real’, so why not show multiple viewpoints and poses simultaneously?

 To test his theory, Picasso painted Les Demoiselles Davignon, which changed the course art and led to the birth of Cubism.

Portrait (cubist) by Stanislav Bojankov
Portrait (cubist) by Stanislav Bojankov

The term cubism comes from the block-like nature of the paintings. In order to fragment the image, Picasso mainly used square shapes to ‘build’ the image. Essentially, he was testing, experimenting and creating new art, which still influences the modern art of today.

Abstract or cubist

Abstract art is about distorting the everyday with the artist showing their own representation of an object or scene.

This can also be applied to Cubism, which is a form of abstract art. It’s a distorted view of reality that serves no other purpose than be a work of art.

Sounds a bit deep, but as the camera captured reality, art then became less about functionality and more about something people could appreciate aesthetically or had to think about.

Interiors

The Cubist style has certainly stood the test of time as it works with a range of modern interiors. If you love a sleek, white interior, then it can add the focal interest to a wall, as well as a pop of colour.

It can also make a great statement piece as visually,  Cubist art is colourful, but often quite challenging. It makes you want to look at it for a while. So hang in a central location where you can get to stop and contemplate it for a while.

Music box (landscape) by Paresh Nrshinga
Music box (landscape) by Paresh Nrshinga

Types of Cubist art

Picasso used a range of subjects for his Cubist paintings. This still applies today with a wide range of themes being captured in this style, such as food, drink, instruments and figures.

Cubist artists tend to use simple shapes and forms. This stems from the fact they like to transform the everyday by distorting the image to make it look as though you’re seeing it from a range of angles.

Artists

There is a wide selection of Cubist art on our site and something to suit for every taste. Arie Coetzee paints abstract images, as well as block-like landscapes and townscapes that are inspired by Cubism.

Neil Hemsley is a digital artist who experiments with a range of styles and themes in his art, from Surrealism to Cubism. He currently has a series of images based on this art movement.

Cubism that doesn't break the budget

There is a wide selection of Cubist art on our site for every budget. Having this style of art on your wall doesn’t need to break the budget. You can buy a work for as little as £90, and then right up to £600.  

If the budget’s looking a bit tight but you’ve seen your dream painting, then there’s always the Own Art scheme to help finance your purchase.

The scheme works on 0% APR and you can spread payments over 10 months, which gives you the opportunity to get that work of art you’ve always wanted to own.